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Forgetting a password is one of the more frustrating things that can happen to you when trying to work. This is far more likely to happen when it is a password that you don’t use very often. A key example would be a root password for your database. While most services that use a password can provide a handy “I’ve forgotten my password” feature, database servers don’t offer the same helpful link. Fortunately, there is a relatively simple solution to resetting your root password for MySQL or MariaDB.

Logical volumes are one of Linux’s methods of getting greater flexibility. These are how the Operating System can use the physical drives within a computer. While under traditional partitioning you would create fixed partitions of primary or extended types within a disk. With Logical Volume Management (LVM), you can create partitions that can span over multiple physical drives and be moved, resized and backed up – all without having to stop a running system while  doing so.

When working with logical volumes in Linux for file systems, one of the big advantages that it brings is the ease of resizing volumes along with the ability to do so on the fly. In previous articles we’ve looked at logical volume management detail and covered the terminology involved. We’ve also set up and configured a basic logical volume system for use, so this time we’ll look at how you can go about resizing your logical volumes.

The number of data breaches compromising user passwords over recent years has highlighted that relying on passwords alone for authenticating your users isn’t enough if you really want to be secure. The solution to this is called multi-factor authentication (2FA).

Over the years since its release, Java has become one of the most popular cross-platform development languages. It ‘s behind blockbuster games like Minecraft through to the server side software such  as Google’s Gmail. Basically, Java is ubiquitous.

Logical volumes provide a great deal of flexibility in how you can manage your filesystems on a Linux dedicated server or VPS. In a previous article, we looked at the advantages that Logical Volume Management (LVM) can bring over using traditional partitions for your Linux system, as well as some of the terminology involved in using logical volumes. This time we are going to build upon that and look to set up LVM on a pair of disks added to an existing system.

Disks, partitions and file storage are fundamental to computing. The concepts behind partitioning and using a disk drive haven’t changed for decades. However, this can be somewhat limiting. Here is where Linux’s Volume Manager comes in handy.


Java is one of the commonly used modern programming languages. Originally designed in the early 90’s at Sun Microsystems, Java was intended to provide programmers with a solution that enabled them to run the same code on any system easily.